PIRILTILI BİR GÜZELLİK İÇİN ÖNEMLİ GIDALAR VE VİTAMİNLER- THE FOODS AND VITAMINS FOR A BRILLIANT BEAUTY

PIRILTILI BİR GÜZELLİK İÇİN ÖNDE GELEN GIDA VE VİTAMİNLER- THE FOODS AND VITAMINS FOR A BRILLIANT BEAUTY

You already know that filling your diet with power foods—like dark leafy greens, dark chocolate, citrus—can help beat chronic conditions like heart disease and diabetes. But did you know that certain foods can also work wonders on your skin?

“There’s a growing body of research showing that diet really does affect your complexion,” says Jessica Wu, MD, a dermatologist in Los Angeles and author of Feed Your Face. “What you eat can affect your hormone balance, cause acne, and create or lessen inflammation, which is associated with skin aging.”

In fact, what you eat can be as important as the serums and creams you apply on your skin, says Dr. Wu. That’s why we rounded up 25 foods that are good for you—and fantastic for your skin. Here’s to you, gorgeous!

http://www.webmd.com/beauty/skin/skin-food

Want truly fabulous skin — glowing, vibrant, and, yes, younger-looking skin? Make sure you’re putting foods for healthy skin on your plate.

“Everything you eat becomes a part of not only your inner being, but the outer fabric of your body as well. The healthier the foods are that you consume, the better your skin will look,” says Samantha Heller, MS, RD, a clinical nutritionist at NYU Medical Center in New York City.

The reverse is true as well, Heller tells WebMD. The less attention we pay to what goes in our mouth, the more problems we may see cropping up with our skin.

“You could have sallow skin, dry skin, older-looking skin. It’s not going to happen overnight, but starve your skin long enough, and it’s going to show,” she says.

What’s more, some health experts believe that when your diet is missing certain foods for healthy skin, other, even more serious skin problems can result.

Elaine Linker, PhD, biochemist and co-founder of DDF Skin Care, says a number of conditions, such as acne, can cause you to suddenly break out. And some chronic skin conditions, such as eczema, may be linked to diet.

http://www.health.com/health/gallery/0,,20481238_4,00.html

If you want radiant skin, the old adage ‘you are what you eat’ has never been more true. Our nutritionist tips will help you nourish your skin from the inside out.

Everyone has a favourite face cream or treatment, but beautiful skin starts with nourishment from within. Older cells are constantly shed and replaced by younger ones and a steady supply of micronutrients is essential to support this rapid growth. Eat the correct balance of foods and you’ll feed your skin the vital nutrients it needs to help it stay soft, supple and blemish-free.

Common skin problems- Genel cilt sorunları

As much as we try to resist it, our skin does age. Wrinkles and age spots are the result of gradual, accumulated damage from the sun, strong soaps, chemicals and poor nutrition. Make sure you follow the guidelines above and try to include antioxidant rich fruit and vegetables containing beta carotene, vitamins C and E, zinc and selenium.

Acne- Akne

Brazil nuts…is caused by inflammation and infection of the sebaceous glands of the skin. Sebaceous glands are stimulated by hormones (particularly androgens). To avoid acne, cut back on saturated and hydrogenated fats in margarines and processed foods. Also cut down on junk food as well as foods high in sugar, such as cakes and biscuits. Eat more raw vegetables, wholegrains, fresh fruit and fish. Try to include selenium-rich foods, such as Brazil nuts, cashew nuts, fresh tuna, sunflower seeds, walnuts and wholemeal bread.

Psorasis- Sedef

Ingredient focus… garlic…appears as red skin patches with silvery scales, most commonly on the elbows and knees. The patches are caused by rapid growth and proliferation of cells in the outer skin layers. Patches can be itchy and sore and in severe cases, the skin may crack and bleed. Some people find outbreaks occur when they feel rundown. Sunburn, alcohol, smoking, obesity and stress are also implicated and there may be trigger foods which you will have to identify using an exclusion diet, though always check with your GP before cutting out food groups. Essential fatty acids (EFAs) from fish oil or cold-pressed nut and seed oils are important to include in the diet. It should also be low in saturated fat and include anti-inflammatory herbs such as turmeric, red pepper, ginger, cumin, fennel, rosemary and garlic.

Eczema-Ekzema

Avocado…is a skin condition that usually begins as patchy redness, often on the hands by can appear anywhere on the skin. Although there are many triggers, one of the most common is food sensitivity. The most common offending foods are milk, eggs, fish, cheese, nuts and food additives. Omega-3 fats, zinc and vitamin E may help reduce symptoms.

Finally…

…once you make changes to your diet, don’t expect an overnight miracle. It takes six weeks for new skin to emerge up to the surface, so the visible benefits from dietary changes will take just as long. For persistent skin conditions, talk to your GP or consider seeing a dermatologist.

All health content on bbcgoodfood.com is provided for general information only, and should not be treated as a substitute for the medical advice of your own doctor or any other health care professional. If you have any concerns about your general health, you should contact  your local health care provider. See our website terms and conditions for more information.

With Fashion Month still in full swing, it’s impossible to miss the one trend that surfaces at every spring show. Glowing, radiant, dewy, luminous—pick your adjective, but you can always count on seeing enviably clear complexions backstage. Take Marc Jacobs, where the models wore moisturizer, sans makeup. Here’s what I took away from that particular look: faces that require zero foundation must depend on something other than good genes and effective products. My conclusion is that naturally gorgeous skin often starts with your diet.

In theory, it’s brilliantly simple. In practice, I had no “foods for flawless skin” list to bring to the grocery store. To get the scoop on healthy eating for healthy skin, I caught up with a dermatologist, a celebrity esthetician, a beauty expert and a registered dietitian. Discover their secrets below.

Why You Should Avoid Sugar- Neden şekerden kaçınmalıyız

“Low-glycemic diets have been shown to be beneficial to acne-prone skin,” says registered dietitian and nutrition expert Alex Caspero, “There are some studies that do not show an association with acne, insulin levels and glycemic loads, but I see consistently positive results in my clients. In my practice, I usually recommend reducing sugar as much as possible. I replace refined, sugary foods with nutrient-dense foods- like fruit, vegetables and healthy sources of Omega-3.”

According to Dr. Wu, protein bars are one of the biggest beauty offenders. “Protein bars are essentially a candy bar,” she warns, “The sugar will quickly get into your bloodstream, making your insulin levels spike, which can aggravate acne, wrinkles and rashes. If you need a quick, portable snack in the middle of the day or after a workout, it’s better to have a handful of almonds and a piece of whole fruit. You’ll be eating better for your skin, and you’ll feel more satisfied.”

Can you add years to your life by making smarter food choices? Yes! There are many variables involved in how long you live, but by following a healthy lifestyle, staying active and eating a nutrient-packed diet, you can help slow the aging process and perhaps even stave off age-related diseases, including osteoporosis, diabetes and heart disease.

DOMATES SALÇASI-TOMATO PASTE

People who ate 5 tablespoons of tomato paste daily, along with almost a tablespoon of olive oil for 12 weeks, had 33% more protection from sunburn compared to a control group that ate just olive oil, according to a 2008 UK study. The antioxidant lycopene (levels of which are higher in cooked, processed tomatoes) improves skin’s natural SPF. (Though Dr. Wu warns that it’s not a replacement for sunscreen! Here’s how to find the best sunscreen for you.)

Tomatoes are the best source of the anti-aging antioxidant lycopene. Surprisingly, lycopene in tomatoes is more easily absorbed by your body when it is cooked or processed, so make sure to stock up on canned tomato sauce, tomato juice, and ketchup.

Reach for tomatoes. A German study found that lycopene-rich tomato paste helped participants prevent sunburn when they combined it with olive oil, daily for ten weeks. Besides being a great source of the antioxidant lycopene, tomatoes are considered a high-carotenoid fruit. These nutrients may help slow down cellular damage from free radicals.

Consuming more lycopene—the carotenoid that makes tomatoes red—may protect your skin from sunburn. In one study, participants who were exposed to UV light had almost 50 percent less skin reddening after they ate 2 1⁄2 tablespoons of tomato paste or drank about 1 2⁄3 cups of carrot juice daily, in addition to their regular diet, for 10 to 12 weeks. Supplements, however, weren’t as effective: in the same study, those who received a lycopene supplement or synthetic lycopene weren’t significantly protected against sunburn.

OLIVE OIL- ZEYTİN YAĞI

When researchers in a 2012 study in PLOS ONE analyzed the diets of 1264 women, they found that a higher consumption of olive oil (more than 8.4 grams or 2 teaspoons a day) was associated with 31% fewer signs of aging compared to people who ate less than 3.8 grams (about 1 teaspoon). Olive oil beat out the other oils tested, including sunflower and peanut. Why? About 75% of the fat in olive oil is monounsaturated fatty acids, which may play a role in the youth boost. The antioxidant polyphenols in olive oil could also quench damaging free radicals.

Healthy Oils. These contain more than essential fatty acids. Eating good-quality oils helps keep skin lubricated and keeps it looking and feeling healthier overall, Lipski tells WebMD.

Which oils are the right oils for healthy skin? Lipski says those labeled cold pressed, expeller processed, or extra virgin are the ones to look for.

Start right now by including more of these 7 antioxidant-rich foods to your diet. We’ve included interesting facts and delicious EatingWell recipes for healthy aging. Here’s to your good health!

“When an oil is commercially processed, the first thing they do is add solvents and raise them to really high temperatures, then put it though five or six processes. Important nutrients are lost,” says Lipski.

By comparison, she says when oils are prepared by the cold-press or expeller process, or, in the case of olive oil, are extra virgin, preparation involves only pressing, heating, and bottling.

“You get all the nutrients that are not only good for your skin, but good for your body,” says Lipski.

Since any fat, even a healthy one, is high in calories, experts remind us that we don’t need more than about two tablespoons a day.

The antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties of olive oil don’t just benefit you on the inside—they soften your skin, too. “Ancient Romans massaged olive oil into their skin,” Dr. Perricone says. “When used topically, olive oil results in smoother, more radiant skin.” Plus, consuming olive oil, a staple in the healthy Mediterranean diet, provides antioxidants to disarm free radicals and reduce inflammation. In addition to working olive oil into your daily diet, apply as a lip gloss and skin soother, as needed. If you have dry skin, you’ll particularly benefit from topical application.

Four decades ago, researchers from the Seven Countries Study concluded that the monounsaturated fats in olive oil were largely responsible for the low rates of heart disease and cancer on the Greek island of Crete. Now we know that olive oil also contains polyphenols, powerful antioxidants that may help prevent age-related diseases.

DARK CHOCOLATE- SİYAH ÇİKOLATA

The sweet treat is rich in cocoa flavanols, plant compounds with antioxidant properties, which help hydrate skin and improve circulation. Women who consumed a high flavanol cocoa powder drink daily for 12 weeks experienced less skin roughness and scaliness compared to a control group. They consumed the equivalent of 3.5 ounces of dark chocolate, but that’s far too many calories for most women, says Lisa Drayer, MA, RD, author of The Beauty Diet. She suggests sticking to a 1-ounce portion, or 150 calories, to reap the good skin benefits without the weight gain.

We won’t judge you if you keep a secret stash of chocolate in your purse or desk (or both). In fact, we recommend you do — especially if you’re willing to share. Dark chocolate helps skin stay hydrated and protects skin from sun damage, and contrary to popular belief, chocolate does not cause acne. Before you make a mad dash to Godiva or Ghirardelli, however, keep in mind that the best kind of chocolate has a high flavanol content and should be at least 60 percent cacao.

ÇUKULATA- CHOCOLATE

The Kuna people of the San Blas islands, off the coast of Panama, have a rate of heart disease that is nine times less than that of mainland Panamanians. The reason? The Kuna drink plenty of a beverage made with generous proportions of cocoa, which is unusually rich in flavanols that help preserve the healthy function of blood vessels. Maintaining youthful blood vessels lowers risk of high blood pressure, type 2 diabetes, kidney disease and dementia.

OATMEAL, YULAF EZMESİ, WHOLE-WHEAT BREAD AND CREALS, TUNA AND NUTS

A whole grain oatmeal is a better pick for breakfast over a bagel and jelly. That’s because the latter offers a double whammy for skin: refined, sugary carbs that prompt your body to make insulin and increase the production of hormones known as androgens. “Elevated androgens cause sebaceous glands in the skin to secrete more oil that gets trapped inside pores, causing pimples,” says Drayer. Instead of brown sugar, add natural sweetness to your oatmeal with chopped fruit. (Give this blueberry-almond oatmeal recipe a try.)

Whole-wheat bread, muffins, and cereals; turkey, tuna and brazil nuts. The mineral selenium connects all these foods for healthy skin. Experts say selenium plays a key role in the health of skin cells. Some studies show that even skin damaged by the sun may suffer fewer consequences if selenium levels are high.

For instance, in two clinical trials, researchers at Edinburgh University showed that when levels of selenium were high, skin cells were less likely to suffer the kind of oxidative damage that can increase the risk of cancer. The results were published in 2003 in both the British Journal of Dermatology and the journal Clinical and Experimental Dermatology. And a group of French researchers found that oral doses of selenium, along with copper, vitamin E and vitamin A could prevent sunburn cell formation in human skin.

What’s more, Lipsky says that filling up on whole-grain products leaves less room for the “white” foods that are a worse choice for skin health. These include white-flour items (bread, cake and pasta), sugar, and white rice. All can affect insulin levels and cause inflammation that may ultimately be linked to skin break outs.

SARDALYA-SARDINES

One serving (3.5 ounces) of these little swimmers contains 1.5 grams of omega-3 fatty acids, making it one of the best sources of the fat. Fatty fish is particularly rich in the type of omega-3 called DHA, an anti-inflammatory. “Inflammation is now known as the root cause of acne,” says Dr. Wu. Packing your diet with these omega-3s (also found in salmon) can help keep your skin clear.

Sardines are one of the healthiest foods we can consume: they’re packed with the omega-3s DHA and EPA, as well as vitamin D, which is found naturally in very few foods. The omega-3s may shield cell walls from free-radical damage caused by UV rays, according to a 2009 study in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. Sardines are also quick to reproduce and have rebounded since the Pacific fishery crashed in the 1940s, so much so they are one of Seafood Watch’s “Super Green” sustainable choices.

YEŞİL ÇAY- GREEN TEA

In a study published in the Journal of Nutrition in 2011, people who drank a beverage containing green tea polyphenols daily for 12 weeks had skin that was more elastic and smooth, and had one-quarter less sun damage when exposed to UV light compared to a control group. The brew’s catechins like EGCG (antioxidants) boost blood flow and oxygen to the skin, which delivers key nutrients to keep your complexion healthy, say researchers. Brew the perfect cup every time with these simple steps.

Green Tea. This beverage deserves a category all its own in any article about foods for healthy skin. The skin-health properties in this beneficial drink just can’t be beat.

“It has anti-inflammatory properties, and it’s protective to the cell membrane. It may even help prevent or reduce the risk of skin cancer,” says Lipski.

Indeed, a study published recently in the Archives of Dermatology shows that whether taken orally or applied to the skin, green tea can reduce the risk of damage from ultraviolet light (such as the burning rays of the sun), and thus reduce the risk of skin cancer.

Heller adds that the polyphenols in green tea have anti-inflammatory properties that may also be beneficial to skin health overall.

Curling up to a cup of green tea does a lot more than relax you. Green tea is filled with inflammation-fighting antioxidants, Dr. Perricone says. What’s more, research from Case Western Reserve University and the University of Alabama at Birmingham shows that drinking green tea may reduce your risk of skin cancer. And when you add a generous squeeze of citrus juice, the tea’s antioxidants get a boost of staying power, so they remain in and benefit the body longer, rather than being digested quickly and having much of the goodness go down the drain, according to Purdue University researchers.

Sip your way to healthy skin. Green tea’s high on the list of skin-friendly beverages thanks to its impressive storehouse of polyphenols. Aim for four cups throughout your day.

WALLNUT – CEVİZ

It’s the only type of nut that contains a significant amount of omega-3 fatty acids, which is especially important for vegetarians who are skipping fish. Walnuts pack an omega-3 called alpha-linolenic acid. “Deficiency in this fat can result in eczema, which is associated with dry, scaly skin,” says Drayer.

You don’t need to eat cupfuls of walnuts to enjoy their many benefits: smoother skin, healthy hair, brighter eyes, and strong bones. Get your daily dose of nutrients like omega-3 fatty acids and vitamin E by eating a handful by themselves or throwing some in your salad, pasta, or dessert.

Looking to add Omega-3 fatty acids to your diet but not a fan of fish? Walnuts are a rich source of Omega-3s, which help put shine in your hair and aid in making skin smoother and younger looking.

Read more: http://www.rd.com/slideshows/8-essential-foods-for-beautiful-skin/#ixzz3Si0jNfYN

It’s the only type of nut that contains a significant amount of omega-3 fatty acids, which is especially important for vegetarians who are skipping fish. Walnuts pack an omega-3 called alpha-linolenic acid. “Deficiency in this fat can result in eczema, which is associated with dry, scaly skin,” says Drayer.

ORANGE AND ORANGE SKIN- PORTAKAL VE PORTAKAL KABUĞU

Oranges, along with mangos, peaches, and watermelon, are rich in beta-cryptoxanthin, an antioxidant and one of a pair of compounds that lowered the risk of arthritis by an impressive 20 to 40 percent in a UK study of 25,000 people.

Read more: http://www.rd.com/slideshows/best-antioxidant-rich-foods/#ixzz3ShzhAAeZ

ORGANİK DANA ETİ- GRASS FED BEEF

Not only does grass-fed beef contain a higher ratio of omega-3 to omega-6 fatty acids (to reduce inflammation), but it also packs nearly 30 grams of protein per 3.5-ounce serving. “Protein is the building block of collagen and elastin tissue, which keeps skin taut and less wrinkled,” says Dr. Wu. Choose lean cuts like sirloin tip and flank steak.

ROSEMARRY- BİBERİYE

Consuming four or more herbs regularly—rosemary or thyme, for example—was associated with up to a 60% reduced risk of melanoma, finds a study in the International Journal of Epidemiology. Herbs pack a ton of antioxidants into a tiny skin-protecting package, squelching free radicals from the sun before they can damage skin.

BADEM SÜTÜ- ALMOND MILK

This makes the list because of what it’s not: dairy. “Research shows dairy is highly inflammatory, which means it will aggravate acne, wrinkles, and rashes,” says Dr. Wu. When you drink coffee or pour a bowl of whole grain cereal, she recommends using a non-dairy milk, like unsweetened almond milk. (Make your own almond milk with this easy recipe!)

SU- WATER

Yes, water keeps your skin hydrated—and staying hydrated makes it appear more plump and less wrinkled. But there’s another reason to fill up on water over other drinks: You’ll save on sugar. Sugars found in juices, sodas, and sports drinks cause your skin major woes, says Drayer. “When blood sugar levels are high, sugars can attach to proteins in collagen and produce compounds that cause skin to sag and wrinkle.”

Water. While the exact amount you should drink each day varies, no one disputes the role good hydration plays in keeping skin looking healthy and even young. When that hydration comes from pure, clean water — not liquids such as soda or even soup — experts say skin cells rejoice.

“It is my belief that our skin needs at least a half gallon of good clean water — that’s about eight glasses — every day,” says Lipski.

While any good, clean water will keep your body and your skin hydrated, Lipski says hard water, the kind high in minerals, is especially good. Using water softeners to de-mineralize drinking water may reduce some of the potentially helpful effects.

“A water softener may help your plumbing, but it’s hard water that is better for your health,” she says.

In addition to keeping cells hydrated, water helps cells move nutrients in and toxins out, which Lipski says automatically leaves skin looking better.

She adds that when we’re properly hydrated, we also sweat more efficiently. Doing so helps keep skin clean and clear as well.

Skin needs moisture to stay flexible. Even mild dehydration will cause your skin to look dry, tired and slightly grey. Drink six to eight glasses of water a day – all fluids count towards your daily allowance, but water is the best. If you work in an office, keep a large bottle of water on your desk to remind you to drink. Herbal, caffeine-free teas are good too. Try to avoid smoking and excessive alcohol consumption, both can age the skin.

SOYA

A small study of middle-aged Japanese women found that those who daily consumed 40 mg of aglycone (an isoflavone found in soy), had fewer fine lines and improved skin elasticity within 12 weeks compared to a placebo. The isoflavone can help stop collagen from breaking down, which is what leads to sagging and lines. You’ll find about 40 mg of isoflavones in 3 ounces of tempeh, 1 ounce of dry roasted soybeans, or 6 ounces of tofu.

Tofu may help to preserve skin-firming collagen because it is rich in isoflavones. In a study published in the Journal of the American College of Nutrition, mice fed isoflavones and exposed to ultraviolet radiation had fewer wrinkles and smoother skin than mice that were exposed to UV light but didn’t get isoflavones. The researchers believe that isoflavones help prevent collagen breakdown.

OYSTERS- İSTRİDYE

You’re looking at the best source of dietary zinc. Six of these bivalves provide over 500% of your daily need in a scant 57 calories. The mineral plays an important role in the growth and function of skin cells and, though more research is needed, some studies suggest that acne sufferers have lower than normal levels of zinc.

The jury’s still out on whether oysters are really aphrodisiacs, but they are a good source of zinc, which aids in skin cell renewal and repair. Zinc also keeps your nails, hair, and eyes healthy. Who needs an aphrodisiac when you look and feel beautiful?

SARI ÇAN BİBER- YELLOW BELL PEPPERS

One study in the British Journal of Nutrition found that people who ate the most green and yellow vegetables (up to 250 grams; one large pepper is about 190 grams) had fewer wrinkles, especially in the crow’s feet area, compared to those who at the least amount (69 grams a day). This may be because of antioxidants that fight aging free radicals, says Dr. Wu.

COFFEE – KAHVE

Women who drank coffee every day had an 11% lower prevalence of non-melanoma skin cancer (the most common form of skin cancer) compared to people who don’t drink coffee, according to a study published in the European Journal of Cancer Prevention in 2007. Downing six cups a day of caffeinated coffee slashed the risk by 30%, however, experts say to keep your habit under 28 cups a week, as higher consumption may lead to other health concerns. As with anything, moderation is key.

Drinking a single cup of coffee daily may lower your risk of developing skin cancer. In one study of more than 93,000 women, published in the European Journal of Cancer Prevention, those who drank one cup of caffeinated coffee a day reduced their risk of developing nonmelanoma skin cancer by about 10 percent. And the more they drank—up to about 6 cups or so per day—the lower their risk. Decaf didn’t seem to offer the same protection.

KIWI –KİVİ

This little fruit packs a wallop of vitamin C—nearly 120% of your daily needs in one medium kiwi. “C stimulates collagen synthesis, which keeps skin taught and smoothes fine lines,” says Drayer. She sites a study in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition that found a diet high in vitamin C was associated with less dryness and less noticeable wrinkles.

This small, brown, fuzzy fruit is loaded with vitamin C and antioxidants, which keep skin firm, help prevent wrinkles, and are great for healthy bones and teeth. The antioxidants in kiwis also protect you from cancer and heart disease.

YUMURTA- EGGS

Eggs offer up a hefty dose of protein without tons of fat, and less fat is a good thing for your skin: Higher fat diets are associated with aging skin. According to a study in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, a 17-gram increase in fat intake increased your odds of developing wrinkles by 28%.

Crack open some eggs. Protein helps repair cells that have suffered free radical damage. Eggs, a complete source of protein, also contain biotin, an essential vitamin that protects against dry skin.

EGG YOLK- YUMURTA SARISI

Egg yolks contain the carotenoid lutein, which like lycopene protects skin from UV damage. Lutein also helps to keep eyes healthy—mounting research links lutein with reduced risk for age-related macular degeneration, the leading cause of blindness in people over 50.

PUMPKIN- BAL KABAĞI

Cooked pumpkin is one of the top sources of beta-carotene. The body converts beta-carotene into vitamin A (a half cup of cooked pumpkin packs nearly 400% of your daily value for A), which is essential for the growth of skin cells. This, in turn, “helps keep skin soft, smooth and wrinkle-free,” says Drayer. (Make the most of your pumpkin with these 20 perfect pumpkin recipes.)

Pumpkin’s orange hue is from carotenoids, wrinkle-fighting plant pigments that help neutralize free radicals in the skin, keeping them from damaging the cells that fast-forward aging. “Pumpkin is filled with vitamins C, E, and A, as well as powerful enzymes that help to cleanse the skin,” explains dermatologist Kenneth Beer, author of Palm Beach Perfect Skin. Plus, pumpkin has hydrating properties, Ionescu adds. Although the seeds make a great fiber-filled snack, you get the skin-saving antioxidants from the pulp.

Like lycopene, beta carotene—the compound that makes pumpkins orange—protects your skin from UV damage. Beta carotene is also converted to vitamin A in the body, which helps to keep your eyes, bones and immune system healthy.

RED WINE- KIRMIZI ŞARAP

When Australian researchers analyzed the diets of more than 1,000 adults, they discovered that the rate of actinic keratoses (skin lesions caused by long-term sun damage) was reduced by 28% in those that sipped a half glass of red wine a day. Red wine is a top source of resveratrol, an antioxidant compound with anti-tumor properties.

Drinking alcohol in moderation protects against heart disease, diabetes and age-related memory loss. Any kind of alcoholic beverage seems to provide such benefits, but red wine has been the focus of much of the research. Red wine contains resveratrol, a compound that likely contributes to its benefits—and, according to animal studies, may activate genes that slow cellular aging.

AY ÇEKİRDEĞİ TOHUMLARI – SUN FLOWER SEEDS

With 37% of your daily needs for vitamin E per ounce, these seeds can help keep your skin pimple-free. That’s according to a study published in Experimental Dermatology that looked at 100 patients recently diagnosed with acne. Researchers found that those suffering from severe acne had nearly 30% lower blood levels of vitamin E compared to a clear-skinned control group. Vitamin E is thought to enhance immune function, allowing the body to fight off the inflammation that leads to acne. (Already dealing with adult acne? These 10 effective solutions can help.)

With 37% of your daily needs for vitamin E per ounce, these seeds can help keep your skin pimple-free. That’s according to a study published in Experimental Dermatology that looked at 100 patients recently diagnosed with acne. Researchers found that those suffering from severe acne had nearly 30% lower blood levels of vitamin E compared to a clear-skinned control group. Vitamin E is thought to enhance immune function, allowing the body to fight off the inflammation that leads to acne. (Already dealing with adult acne? These 10 effective solutions can help.)

HAVUÇ – CARROT

Carrots contain the carotenoids beta carotene and lycopene—both of which may shield your skin against UV damage. In one study, participants who were exposed to UV light had almost 50 percent less skin reddening after they drank about 1 2⁄3 cups of carrot juice or ate 2 1⁄2 tablespoons of tomato paste daily, in addition to their regular diet, for 10 to 12 weeks.

MACKEREL – USKUMRU

Mackerel is one of the best sources of vitamin B12, containing 16 mcg, or 270% of what your body needs in a day. That’s significant because many people miss out on B12 when they’re trying to eat less meat (or vegetarians who don’t eat any at all). One of the symptoms of B12 deficiency? Hyperpgimentation (dark spots) and vitiligo (white spots). Making sure you get enough of this vitamin every day (vegan sources include nutritional yeast) can help keep your skin even-toned.

CHICK PEAS-NOHUT

Korean researchers found that when adults followed a low–glycemic load diet for 10 weeks, they reduced both painful inflamed pimples and red spots. Why? High-glycemic diets include foods that rapidly increase blood sugar, causing high insulin levels that are thought to lead to hormonal changes that cause acne. Beans, particularly chickpeas, are low on the glycemic index since they’re rich in protein and fiber, two nutrients that slow down digestion and lower the blood sugar response.

BLUE BERRIES- YABAN MERSİNİ, STRAW BERRY- ÇİLEK

This low-profile berry was ranked number one in antioxidant activity by the U.S. Department of Agriculture compared to 40 common fruits and vegetables. The antioxidants in blueberries protect you from premature aging, so add half a cup to your yogurt or cereal every day.

Blackberries, blueberries, strawberries, and plums. The common link between these four foods is their high antioxidant content. In a study recently published in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, these four fruits weighed in with the highest “total antioxidant capacity” of any food. The benefits of these foods for healthy skin are plentiful.

“Free radicals — like the kind formed from sun exposure — damage the membrane of skin cells, potentially allowing damage to the DNA of that cell,” says Heller. The antioxidants and other phytochemicals in these fruits can protect the cell, she says, so there is less chance for damage.

“When you help protect the cells from damage and disintegration, you also guard against premature aging. In this respect, these fruits may very well help keep your skin younger looking longer,” says Heller.

According to the new study, other fruits and vegetables with a “high antioxidant capacity” include artichokes, beans (the study cited black, red, and pinto), prunes, and pecans.

Blueberries have more antioxidants—those magical molecules that can help prevent a host of maladies—than 40 other common fruits and vegetables. Eating one cup of wild blueberries will provide 13,427 total antioxidants, about 10 times the USDA’s recommendation. The farmed variety will give you 9,019 per cup.

Like blueberries and raspberries, strawberries are high in antioxidants, which protect healthy cells from many cancers.

Eating more vitamin C-rich foods, such as strawberries, may help to ward off wrinkles and age-related dryness, suggests research from 2007 in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. Vitamin C’s skin-smoothing effects may be due to its ability to mop up free radicals produced from ultraviolet rays and also its role in collagen synthesis. Collagen is fibrous protein that keeps skin firm and vitamin C is essential for collagen production.

In a landmark study published in 1999, researchers at Tufts University’s Jean Mayer Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging fed rats blueberry extract for a period of time that in “rat lives” is equivalent to 10 human years. These rats outperformed rats fed regular chow on tests of balance and coordination when they reached old age. Compounds in blueberries (and other berries) mitigate inflammation and oxidative damage, which are associated with age-related deficits in memory and motor function.

RASPBERRIES- AHUDUDU

Make your portion more powerful: A study in the Journal of Nutrition determined that the anti­oxidant ellagic acid (found in raspberries, pomegranates, walnuts, and cranberries) enhanced the ability of quercetin (an antioxidant found in apples, grapes, onions, and buckwheat) to kill off cancerous cells.

STRAWBERRIES – ÇİLEK

Strawberries have more anti-aging vitamin C per serving than oranges or grapefruit. And research published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition shows that people who eat foods rich in vitamin C have fewer wrinkles and less age-related dry skin than those who don’t.

Vitamin C fights free radicals, which damage cells and break down collagen, leading to fine lines. For smoother, better-hydrated skin, apply a natural berry mask once or twice a week, and eat vitamin C–rich foods daily, says Ramona Ionescu, primary aesthetician at New York City’s Cornelia Day Resort.

DENİZ SOMONU – WILD SALMON

Wild salmon — not farm-raised — is one of the best food sources for omega-3 fatty acids, which helps keep your skin supple and moisturized. Salmon also has selenium, a mineral that protects the skin from sun exposure. The vitamin D in salmon keeps your bones and teeth strong and healthy, too. You won’t have a problem adding salmon to your diet since there are hundreds of ways to enjoy this beauty superfood. Try it grilled, baked, in your pasta, with a salad, in sushi, or just with a side of asparagus.

Salmon, Walnuts, Canola Oil, and Flax Seed. These seemingly unrelated foods all deliver essential fatty acids, and thus are key foods for healthy skin.

“Essential fatty acids are responsible for healthy cell membranes, which is not only what act as barriers to harmful things but also as the passageway for nutrients to cross in and out and for waste products to get in and out of the cell,” says Ann Yelmokas McDermott, PhD, a nutritionist at the Jean Mayer USDA Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging at Tufts University in Boston.

Because it is the cell membrane that also holds water in, the stronger that barrier is the better your cells can hold moisture. And that means plumper, younger looking skin.

Also, says Heller, the same inflammatory process that can harm our arteries and cause heart disease can harm skin cells. Essential fatty acids can offer protection to both.

The best-known essential fatty acids are omega 3 and omega 6, which must be in balance for good health (and good skin). Though we all seem to get enough omega 6, Heller says many people lack omega 3s. Fish, walnut, and flax seed oil are among the best sources.

Slow down aging with salmon. Salmon contains astaxanthin, a carotenoid that improves skin elasticity, so you’ll have fewer fine lines.

The omega-3 fatty acids DHA and EPA (docosahexaenoic and eicosapentaenoic acids, respectively) found in salmon may shield cell walls from free-radical damage caused by UV rays, according to a 2009 study in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. Researchers followed the eating habits of more than 1,100 Australian adults for approximately five years and found that for those who ate a little more than 5 ounces of omega-3-rich fish—such as salmon—each week the development of precancerous skin lesions decreased by almost 30 percent. Aim to eat two servings of fatty fish each week: not only are the omega-3s good for your skin, they’re good for your heart too.

SPINACH- ISPANAK

This leafy green vegetable is rich in nutrients and antioxidants. Spinach is loaded with lutein, which keeps your eyes healthy and sparkling. Spinach is also a good source of vitamins B, C, and E, potassium, calcium, iron, magnesium, and omega-3 fatty acids. Trade your lettuce for spinach, or saute spinach for a quick, healthy side.

Spinach boasts lutein, a carotenoid that protects your skin from UV damage. When buying spinach, pick the one right up in the light: new research, published in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, reveals that spinach stored continuously under the light for as little as three days boasted higher levels of vitamin C and preserved levels of K, E, folate and the carotenoids lutein and zeaxanthin.

YOGURT – YOĞURT

One cup of low-fat yogurt has more calcium than a cup of fat-free milk, which is great for your posture, nails, and teeth. Mix it with fruit or granola for a healthy breakfast or that essential midafternoon snack.

Low-Fat Dairy Products. One the most important components of skin health is vitamin A. One of the best places to get it is low-fat dairy products. In fact, experts say that the health of our skin cells is dependent on dietary vitamin A.

Nutrition expert Liz Lipski, PhD, CCN, says it’s doubly important to eat A-rich dairy foods if you have either diabetes or a thyroid condition.

“Many people who have these problems can’t convert the beta carotene to vitamin A, which is the form found in many foods that we normally associate with this vitamin, such as carrots,” says Lipski, the founder and Director of InnovativeHealing.com and the author of Digestive Wellness.

The A in dairy products, she says is “true A,” so everyone’s skin can use it.

Lipski says low-fat yogurt is not only high in vitamin A, but also acidophilus, the “live” bacteria that is good for intestinal health. Turns out, it may also have an impact on the skin.

“Anything that helps keep digestion normal, any live bacteria or enzymes, is also going to be reflected in healthy-looking skin,” says Lipski.

“It’s controversial, but I don’t recommend dairy,” cautions Caspero, “There are some studies that show associations between dairy and acne, but not necessarily cause and effect. Either way, just like sugar, I see great results when I completely remove dairy from the diet. The hypothesis is that since the majority of milk in the US comes from pregnant cows, the hormone levels in milk may play a role in excess sebum production, which promotes acne. Sebum production is influenced by androgens and hormonal mediators, such as insulin-like growth factors found in milk and other animal products. If people must have milk or yogurt, I recommend non-dairy alternatives or goat’s milk.”

In the 1970s, Soviet Georgia was rumored to have more centenarians per capita than any other country. Reports at the time claimed that the secret of their long lives was yogurt, a food ubiquitous in their diets. While the age-defying powers of yogurt never have been proven directly, yogurt is rich in calcium, which helps stave off osteoporosis and contains “good bacteria” that help maintain gut health and diminish the incidence of age-related intestinal illness.

SWEET PATATOES – TATLI PATATES

You should be eating this superfood more often than just at Thanksgiving. Sweet potatoes are packed with beta-carotene, an antioxidant that fights aging.

Hate them mashed? Try them cut up and roasted with herbs or onions for an easy, awesome side.

AVACADOS-AVAKADO

Avocados are not just for eating! A good source of biotin, avocados help to prevent dry skin and brittle hair and nails. When applied topically, they can hydrate parched skin.

A tip from 1,801 Home Remedies:

Create a moisturizing mask. Pit the fruit, puree the pulp, and pat it on your face. The oil acts as an emollient. It also contains beneficial vitamin E.

PAPAYA:

Papaya is an excellent source of vitamin C—and research suggests that vitamin C may help protect skin cells against sun damage by promoting the repair of DNA that’s been harmed by UV rays. UV rays break the chemical bonds of skin cells, killing them and damaging their DNA, which may eventually cause cancerous growth. You can find vitamin C in a multitude of cosmetics—of which some have been shown to be effective in protecting skin—but why not go straight to the source for a tasty boost of vitamin C.

PINK GRAPEFRUIT- PEMBE GREYFURT

Pink grapefruit gets its pink-red hue from lycopene, a carotenoid that may help to keep your skin smooth. In a study published in 2008 in the European Journal of Pharmaceutics and Biopharmaceutics, researchers found that of the 20 individuals studied, those who had higher skin concentrations of lycopene had smoother skin.

CORN – MISIR

Corn is an excellent source of lutein, a type of carotenoid. Like lycopene, lutein shields your skin from UV damage. If corn is out of season, don’t hesitate to turn to frozen alternatives. Frozen vegetables may be even more healthful than some of the fresh produce sold in supermarkets, says Gene Lester, Ph.D., a plant physiologist with the USDA Agricultural Research Service. Why? Fruits and vegetables chosen for freezing tend to be processed at their peak ripeness, a time when—as a general rule—they are most nutrient-packed.

EDAMAME-YEŞİL SOYA FASULYESİ

Edamame is rich in isoflavones—and isoflavones act like antioxidants, scavenging for and mopping up harmful free radicals caused by sun exposure. Isoflavones may also help to preserve skin-firming collagen—which begins to decline starting in our twenties.

KALİFORNİA BİBERİ – BELL PEPPERS

A medium-size red bell pepper boasts more than 200 percent of the daily value of vitamin C. Eating more vitamin C-rich foods may help to protect skin cells from the sun’s harmful rays as research suggests that vitamin C may promote the repair of DNA that’s been damaged by UV rays.

TEA- SİYAH ÇAY

Research suggests caffeine in tea (coffee too) may help to protect your skin against skin cancer. Caffeine basically kills precancerous and ultraviolet-damaged skin cells by blocking a protein that they need to divide, explains Paul Nghiem, M.D., Ph.D., associate professor of dermatology at the University of Washington Medical School. In a study where mice were exposed to harmful sunburn-causing ultraviolet B rays caffeine inhibited the formation of skin tumors

SOYMILK-SOYA SÜTÜ

Soymilk may help to preserve skin-firming collagen because it is rich in isoflavones. In a study published in the Journal of the American College of Nutrition, mice fed isoflavones and exposed to ultraviolet radiation had fewer wrinkles and smoother skin than mice that were exposed to UV light but didn’t get isoflavones. The researchers believe that isoflavones help prevent collagen breakdown.

TUNA-TUNA BALIĞI

Tuna—and other omega-3-rich fish—may help keep your skin looking youthful and prevent skin cancer. EPA (eicosapentaenoic acid), one of the omega-3 fats in fatty fish, has been shown to preserve collagen, a fibrous protein that keeps skin firm. And EPA in combination with the other omega-3 in fish, DHA (docosahexaenoic acid), helps to prevent skin cancer by reducing inflammatory compounds that can promote tumor growth, says Homer S. Black, Ph.D., professor emeritus in the department of dermatology at Baylor College of Medicine in Houston. Aim to eat two servings of fatty fish each week: not only are the omega-3s good for your skin, they’re good for your heart too.

BROKOLİ-BROCOLLI

Eating more vitamin C-rich foods, such as broccoli, may help to ward off wrinkles and age-related dryness, suggests research from 2007 in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. Vitamin C’s skin-smoothing effects may be due to its ability to mop up free radicals produced from ultraviolet rays and also its role in synthesizing collagen, a fibrous protein that keeps skin firm.

FOODS FOR 5 TIMES A DAY – GÜNDE 5 VAKİT YENECEKLER

Papaya Fruit and vegetables contain powerful antioxidants that help to protect skin from the cellular damage caused by free radicals. Free radicals are caused by smoking, pollution and sunlight and can cause wrinkling and age spots. Eat a rainbow of colourful fruit and vegetables and aim for at least five portions a day. Betacarotene, found in pumpkin, carrots and sweet potatoes, and lutein, found in kale, papaya and spinach are potent antioxidants, important for normal skin cell development and healthy skin tone.

VITAMIN C – Vitamin C

Vitamin C is also a super antioxidant. It is needed for a strong immune system, radiant skin and helps blemishes heal properly. The best sources are blackcurrants, blueberries, broccoli, guava, kiwi fruits, oranges, papaya, strawberries and sweet potatoes. They all help to produce collagen that strengthens the capillaries that supply the skin.

ÇOK SERT DIETLERDEN UZAK DURMA- CUT OUT CRASH DIETS

Repeatedly losing and regaining weight can take its toll on your skin, causing sagging, wrinkles and stretch marks. Crash diets are often short in essential vitamins too. Over long periods of time this type of dieting will reflect on your skin.

STOCK UP SELENIUM

Selenium is a powerful antioxidant. It works alongside other antioxidants such as vitamins E and C and is essential for the immune system. Studies suggest that a selenium-rich diet can help to protect against skin cancer, sun damage and age spots. One way to boost your intake is to eat Brazil nuts. Just four nuts will provide the recommended daily amount (RDA). Mix Brazil nuts with other seeds rich in vitamin E as a snack or salad sprinkle. Other good sources are fish, shellfish, eggs, wheatgerm, tomatoes and broccoli.

Vitamin E and Hazelnut

Vitamin E protects skin from oxidative (cell) damage and supports healthy skin growth. Foods high in vitamin E include almonds, avocado, hazelnuts, pine nuts and sunflower and corn oils.

YAĞDAN KORKMAYINIZ- DONT BE AFRAID OF FAT

Spiced roast side of salmon Monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fats – the types found in avocados, fish, nuts and seeds – provide essential fatty acids which act as a natural moisturiser for your skin, keeping it supple. These fats also come packaged with a healthy dose of vitamin E (a vitamin many of us lack), which will help protect against free radical damage.

FİTO ESTROJEN ALIMINI ARTTIRINIZ- EAT MORE PHYTO-ESTROGENS

Phyto-estrogens are natural chemicals found in plant foods (phyto meaning plant). They have a similar structure to the female sex hormone oestrogen and have been found to help keep our natural hormones in balance. There are different types, some are found in soya bean products (isoflavones), whereas others are found in the fibre of wholegrains, fruit, vegetables and flax seeds (lignans). Include phyto-estrogen rich soya, wholegrains, fruits and vegetables as part of a balanced diet.

OMEGA -3 YAĞLARI- OPT FOR OMEGA- 3 OILS

Make sure you get enough omega-3 and omega-6 fats. These are essential fatty acids which mean they cannot be made in the body and must be obtained through the diet. You will find omega-3s in oily fish and plant sources such as flaxseed oil, linseeds, walnut and rapeseed oil. Omega-3 fats encourage the body to produce anti-inflammatory compounds, which can help skin, particularly inflammatory skin conditions such as eczema and psorasis.

GLISEMİK İNDEKSİ DÜŞÜK YİYECEKLER YİYİNİZ- GO FOR LOW-GI CARBS

Eat plenty of beans, pulses, porridge and other slow-releasing carbohydrates. These release sugar into the blood stream gradually, providing you with a steady supply of energy and leaving you feeling satisfied for longer and therefore less likely to snack. Avoid high GI carbohydrates like biscuits and sugary drinks, as they lead to production of insulin, which may damage collagen and accelerate wrinkles.

ÇİNKOYU UNUTMAYINIZ- DO NOT FORGET ZINC

Zinc is involved in the normal functioning of the sebaceous glands in the skin (which produce oil) and helps to repair skin damage and keep skin soft and supple. Zinc-rich foods include fish, lean red meat, wholegrains, poultry, nuts, seeds and shellfish.

EN YÜKSEK 10 ANTİOKSİDAN MEYVE

ERIK- PRUNES

Black plums have 4,873 total antioxidants, and their dried counterpart, prunes pack 7,291 into just half a cup, according

KURU ÜZUMLER- RAISINS

Similarly, red grapes have 2,016 total antioxidants per serving, and raisins contain 2,490.

Blackberries are rich in antioxidants, but know that they’re also packed with polyols, the main component in sugar substitutes (which are often blamed for abdominal issues).

SİYAH ERIKLER- PLUMS

Pick the black kind to get 4,873 antioxidants per serving. Dried plums (prunes) offer slightly more.

NAR- POMAGRANATE

Put pomegranate on your list. When applied topically, this antioxidant-rich fruit may help skin create more collagen, while speeding healing.

BAKLİYAT- BEANS

Build better skin with beans. Another protein source, legumes help repair cells that have suffered free radical damage. During digestion, protein breaks down into amino acids, the building blocks of cells. Amino acids help to speed the repair and regeneration of skin cells and collagen.

PIRILTILI BİR CİLT İÇİN NELER YEMELİ- WHAT TO EAT FOR A GLOWING SKIN

“I find that the best skin diet is one that involves eating vegetables of different colors for every meal and a green juice every day,” says celebrity esthetician (and founder of the eponymous salon and skincare line) Joanna Vargas. Her client Rachel Weisz follows this routine, but Vargas assures me it works on everyone. Another favorite? Avocados. “One of my best tips is to start by eating a bit of avocado everyday as part of your salad, or even throwing a half of an avocado into your morning smoothie,” she tells me, “It supplies the skin with healthy fats and phytonutrients.” Her last piece of advice is tailored toward the picky eaters: “If I have a client who doesn’t eat salad or drink green juices, I tell them to go to Whole Foods and buy liquid chlorophyll. It tastes like mint, oxygenates the skin and works from the inside-out to keep the skin healthy and glowing.”

Dr. Wu recommends vegetables in these three colors: red (specifically tomatoes), yellow and green. “Tomatoes are good for helping reduce sun damage,” she says, “They’re high in the antioxidant lycopene, which helps fight free radicals. The antioxidant is most easily absorbed when the tomatoes have been cooked, which releases it from the plant cells. It’s also easier for your body to absorb it if you eat the tomatoes along with some healthy fats, like avocado or olive oil. The amount of lycopene varies depending on the type of tomato and its ripeness. In general, the redder the tomato, the more lycopene it has.” Picking green and yellow vegetables works similarly: “The darker and brighter the color, the more nutrients. If you’re picking greens for a salad, choose darker green greens like kale or spinach. Better yet, choose arugula or dandelion greens. These vegetables fight the free radicals that break down collagen over time, so they can help support the delicate, thin skin around your eyes.”

Lastly, make sure you’re not neglecting the rest of your diet. “You also need to make sure you’re getting enough carbohydrates and protein,” says Crescenzi, “Carbs will give you fuel during your workouts, and protein will help repair and build muscle. It’s all about a healthy balance. Drink water too; hydration will help flush out toxins.”

Bonus Step: Supplement with Spices

So what does Caspero recommend for gorgeous skin? Foods high in skin-strengthening Omega-3 fatty acids (think sardines, chia seeds, flaxseed and walnuts), collagen-boosting vitamin C (bell peppers, strawberries, citrus fruits, kale and broccoli) and antioxidant-rich vitamins A and E (almond butter, swiss chard, wheat germ, pumpkin, sweet potatoes, carrots and cantaloupe).

There’s a catch, though: “Most of us think of fruits and vegetables as antioxidant sources, but surprisingly, herbs and spices pack the most punch. Turmeric, a spice often found in Indian cuisine, is one of the best.” If you find it difficult to work the ingredient into your diet, try ingesting it supplement form (she loves HUM Nutrition’s Turn Back Time).

REFERANCES:

http://www.prevention.com/beauty/natural-beauty/25-best-foods-your-skin/tomatoes

http://www.fitnessmagazine.com/recipes/healthy-eating/superfoods/top-10-superfoods-for-skin-and-hair/?page=6

http://www.webmd.com/beauty/skin/skin-food

http://www.health.com/health/gallery/0,,20481238_4,00.html

Read more: http://www.rd.com/slideshows/8-essential-foods-for-beautiful-skin/#ixzz3ShxENo3Y

http://www.forbes.com/sites/sarahwu/2014/09/16/eating-for-beauty-the-best-diet-for-healthy-clear-skin/

http://www.eatingwell.com/nutrition_health/healthy_aging/foods_for_beautiful_skin?page=4

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